10 Production Music Mistakes To Avoid Like The Plague

First things first: You’re not a fat guy getting on a cheesy consumer level elliptical stuffing your pie hole with an oversized cheeseburger. You are a videographer or filmmaker who takes your profession seriously and you are proud of your work. You know that a killer audio track will elevate your projects no matter how good the visuals are. You may have been lead astray from colleagues or peers that aren’t necessarily experts on this topic. You may be falling into habits that are hindering you from making your best work better than your competitors, or worse yet, you may be setting yourself up for possible litigation. Check out the following list of common mistakes to make sure you are making all the right moves with your underscores.

1: Using unlicensed or improperly cleared music.

Imagine walking into Moe’s Furniture Heaven, you know it’s that place with plush faux cowhide sectionals that seat 12, (or 8 plus your fat brother-in-law) and just grabbing the nearest recliner you see and rolling it out the door without paying for it. Using unlicensed music is no different-this is someone’s property and unless you are granted a license to use it, you are in effect stealing. This may not seem like a big deal, until someone nails you for it after your footage is being broadcast. Ruh Roh – say goodbye to your relationship with that broadcaster/production company etc..

2: Same as 1 with another explanation that seems to always work

YOU DON’T HAVE THE RIGHT TO USE STAIRWAY TO HEAVEN or JUMP or some piece of MILEY CYRUS GARBAGE or ANY OTHER PIECE OF MUSIC just because you think it looks neat with your picture. Putting any piece of music to your video without a license is a violation of copyright law.

3: Jumping on The Zeitgeist Bandwagon

Are you kidding us? Do you REALLY want to use that simpering Ukelele and Bell thing with a female voice merrily tiptoeing through the tulips wisping “OH OH OH OH OH OH OH”? Hey, we’ll sell it to you if you must, but c’mon don’t be such a copycat. Quality libraries have hundreds of options available. Take some time to create your own musical identity. You might even consider juxtaposing less obvious genres. The results might amaze you.

4: Is that an audio edit or did your cat just jump on the laptop?

Graceful usage of fades is imperative. Abrupt audio can jar your viewer and drastically cheapen your work. Here’s an inside tip: When fading a ringout ending, typically 2500 ms will do the trick, if you need to fade within the body of a track, you’ll generally need significantly more than that.

5: Using The Same Music Same Music Same Music Same Music Same Music

Unless you’re Yoko Ono or the production team at a Hindu Monastery, chances are you’re going to have some points of emotional/informational divergence in your work. Highlight these with effective and tasteful music choices. Even if you’ve got a fixed one shot for 5 minutes, try finding the moment within the picture/narrative/voiceover when you can shift music and prevent your viewer from hitting the remote or going into a coma.

6: Not looking deep enough into your search results

When dealing with an extensive catalog like ours or other quality libraries, producers are often faced with overwhelming amounts of material. Even when using search tools we offer that help hone down the choices, there may still be a few pages of returns. Helpful Hint: Patience is a virtue, we all have a little ADD, this isn’t Google-the cues on page 4 of the returns are awesome and you should take the time to scan through.

7: Not taking advantage of features that Production Music Libraries offer

Don’t tell us you never had trouble locating a track. Everyone does from time to time. Even when you think you know a library catalog inside and out, you probably don’t. When a library offers you Free Search assistance (Hint: We do) use it.  At the very least, you might get hipped up to some choices you hadn’t previously considered. Which leads us to:

8: Get out of the rut.

We know you love AMAZING WORLD and PRODUCT INTRODUCTION. We know this because we can see how many times we license them and of course we are more than happy to license them again and again, but try using a feature like “MORE LIKE THESE” and open yourself up to the incredible effect a slightly different musical approach can have on your footage.

9: But wait there’s more…need for music that is and you’re broke

It’s an unfortunate reality that production music in so many cases is treated as the bastard child of the media world. Forgotten in the attic until the day when you realize you need it.  Of course the budget has been blown to shreds on that location shoot and the 14 course meal you had catered for the talent. Yikes. Bet you wish you had that blanket license now doncha?

As a business, we’re of course happy to sell at full price all day long, but as fellow media production veterans who have suffered almost every imaginable indignity along the way, we try to keep our Kumbaya thing happening as much as possible. The Organic Music Library and many other reputable companies offer EXTREMELY DISCOUNTED BLANKET LICENSES. For anybody using more than 10 pieces of production music a year, this is a no-brainer. We also offer special price points for what we term Level 2 customers, these are smaller companies with teeny tiny budgets who deserve access to good music too and an occasional hug.

10: Cue Sheet Dysfunctionsitis Disorder

A terrible condition in which production teams and broadcasters fail to understand the importance of filing an accurate cue sheet. Generally incurable, but treatable. When you produce programming that gets broadcast, the music within the production needs to be logged on a cue sheet in order for the writers and publishers to claim what are called performance royalties. Most networks have agreements in place with ASCAP/BMI/SESAC etc. and it doesn’t cost you anything to do the right thing. Consider that the people who wrote the production music that is making your show totally ( fill in appropriate descriptive: ass kicking, tearjerking, hysterical, sinister etc.) rely on these royalties to help them survive. Most libraries (HINT: We do) will fill these out for you and save you the administrative work.

These may seem somewhat obvious to you, but it doesn’t hurt to take a few minutes and do a reality check. Ask yourself if your production music is working for you as is or if it may be time to shake things up. If you need a good place to start, The Organic Music Library is waiting for you. Feel free to contact us with any questions.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Funkifying the Celluloid: Great Moments of Black Music in Film

AfroIt’s February. It’s cold, the Superbowl is over, the Olympics are in full effect and it’s Black History month. So we thought we’d take a few minutes and create a small list of some of our favorite moments in film and television that have spotlighted African American music through the years. This is a partial list of highlights and by no means a ‘best of” list. These titles are not ranked in any order of quality, this is just a stream of consciousness smattering of some great moments of soulful music in media that come to mind. We encourage you to feel free to add your favorites to the list in the comments below.

  • 1929 – “St. Louis blues” a two-reel short film starring Bessie Smith and featuring Bessie’s amazing performance of  W.C. Handy’s, “St. Louis Blues.” The earliest occurrence that comes to our minds (although there may be earlier examples).
  • 1959- Otto Preminger’s “Anatomy of a Murder” - score by Duke Ellington and His Orchestra. Duke was the  First African-American composer nominated for an  Academy Award for this soundtrack.
  • 1971 “Shaft” – Enough said.
  • 1972- “Supa Fly” - What can you say about this one? Possibly the greatest soundtrack ever. Curtis Mayfield literally flipped the message of this film from being a promo film for cocaine to an illustration of the ill effects the drug had on the Black Community.
  • 1972 – 77  “Sanford and Son” (TV Theme) Quincy Jones provided the funk for this one with some bottom end groove genius from Chuck Rainey’s  P-bass.
  • 1974- Dino De Laurentiis’ “Death Wish” –  Score by Herbie Hancock. Deep funky jazz.
  • 1974 - “Foxy Brown” – Willie Hutch provides the grooves for this one, and weather you were black or white growing up in the 70′s, you thought Pamela Grier was hot.
  • 1975 – “Mahogany” Produced by Motown Record’s Berry Gordy, starring the label’s biggest star at the time – Diana Ross.  “Do You Know Where You’re Going To” was the standout track.
  • 1983 – “The Big Chill” –  When they started grooming the corpse to the beat of Marvin Gaye’s  “Grapevine” you knew you were in for something special in this film. The rest of the movie is laced with more Motown gold.
  • 1994 – “Crooklyn” – Spike Lee always chooses great music for his “joints” and Terrance Blanchard always provides great musical scores. But the collection in this film is like a K-Tel nostalgia collection of the best soul from the mid 70′s.
  • 1997 - “Love Jones”  - Young, hipster, urban, knowledge seekers fall in love to the music of Lauryn Hill, Casandra Wilson, Wycleff Jean and numerous other soul providers.
  • 1998 – “Lock Stock and Two Smoking Barrels”-  Guy Ritchie utilized the uber funk track “The Payback” by James Brown in this film. Interestingly that song was rejected by director Larry Cohen for “Hell Up in Harlem” (the film it was originally intended for) because he though it was “not funky enough.”  Yo Larry … would you like a few lessons on the meaning of  “the One?”
  • 1999 - “Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai”James Jarmusch tapped the talents of RZA for some Wu Tang ambiance.
  • 2000 - “Boiler Room”  - Features the vibey hip-hop of a Tribe Called Quest and De La Soul amongst others.
  • 2005 – 09 – “Everybody Hates Chris” (TV Show) a smattering of 80′s funk with original music by Marcus Miller.
  • 2010 – 13 – Treme (HBO) The musical supervision in this show was so lovingly and authentically crafted, it deserves to be on ALL lists of great music in media. This show highlighted every genre of music, both Black and White, that was born in New Orleans. At times it seemed the music was more important than the plot (no discredit to the story-line) in this mini-series. 
  • 2012 – “Django Unchained” Modern hip-hop curiously makes its way to the late 1800s.

Funkify YOUR productions with this music from The Organic Music Library:

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Romantic & Sexy Production Music, A Valentine’s Day Usage Manual

Back in the days of the Silent Movie, local piano players tinkled the eighty eights in order to underscore the overacting and telegraph to the somewhat shellshocked audience what they should be feeling. The Heroine is on the railroad tracks, cue the diminished chords and make them tremble etc. Fast forward a few years and we observe the onset of the “Love Scene” and it’s natural partner, the saxophone. How this production music event happened is a mystery that will be reserved for film music anthropologists, but suffice it to say that the implied moaning in the boudoir was made real by the slinky woodwind gyrations and let us know with no uncertainty that yes, action was being got; your imagination did the rest. Time marched on, cinematic heroines got nuder and nuder, there was less to the imagination, yet still did the saxophone remain the production music instrument of desire. To this very day, low budget Lifetime flicks starring (insert fave heroine here; we’ll go with Eva Longoria for 800 Alex) maintain this hallowed tradition. Whether it’s a misty, female targeted, “he’s so wonderful I’ll give myself unto him and he’ll love me forever even though I stop taking care of myself” kind of thing or a downright Va-Va-Va-Voom strip-a-thon (that’s a lot of hyphens). The sexophone (no it’s not a typo-it’s a snarky play on words) will ever remain supreme as the instrument of Eros. Here are some perfect examples from our perfect production music library:

Happy Valentines Day from the Organic Music Library

She Loves Me She Loves Me Not…more than likely the latter, but that doesn’t stop you from trying and we love you for it. Get in the mood for love with these Romantic And Sexy cues.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Finding that Perfect Holiday Production Music Cue

It’s that time of year where video editors and filmmakers of all ages dream of emptying their stockings onto the floor and finding a pile of quality, holiday production music perfectly suited to the contexts of their footage.

Oh sure it’s easy wherein you have the perfect 1950’s traditional  scene where the children are innocent and wide eyed and still have not had the experience of Marilyn Monroe’s centerfold, dad’s wearing a suit while he smokes his pipe (he has experienced Marilyn Monroe’s centerfold)  and mom is baking enough sweets to to put the Green Bay Packers and two generation of their offspring into a diabetic ward for the next 70 years.  For that, you just grab your traditional holiday music, and load in the first one that brings a tear to your eye as it reminds you of the time that you wanted a bike and got an ugly sweater and some socks.

But what if dad’s pipe has something other than tobacco in it, mom’s doing shots of Jagermeister at the lesbian neighbor’s house while getting a tattoo, and the kids are more jaded than a sailor after a week’s leave in a New Orleans brothel that is located over top of a crack house. On top of that, the rest of your score sounds as if it were created by a guy with half of his head shaved off and body piercing that leads to comparisons with the World War II navy mine that washed ashore on Gilligan’s Island. For that, you are going to need something slightly beyond Bing Crosby’s “White Christmas.”  How about a version of Jingle Bells, that features chunky guitars and turntables?

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


Or this prog rock tinged, epic sounding rendition of God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

What if your main characters are a couple of teen siblings running off to Tijuana on Christmas Eve to spite their parents and lose their virginity. On the way they get sentimental about the good old days before they realized that dad was really the cable guy. They glare out on to the Mexican roads to the sound of this Mariachi-esque Christmas cue.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Then you are faced with a scene that takes place circa 1964 in Memphis and your male lead is still wearing pork chop sideburns and drives a 56 Buick as he flees town for a new life that doesn’t require much book learnin’. The director cuts to a montage of previous Christmases and you need that perfect Booker T thing that also telegraphs Christmas. Well, you are in luck… Try “Away in the Memphis”

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

or this “Christmas with Santo and Johnny” style cue.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Or that jewelry commercial that features the 20 something couple in front of the Christmas Tree wearing really expensive pajamas. He presents her with the necklace she’s always wanted…because he loves her, or is it because he is guilty about having relations with her sorority sister who was the maid of honor in their wedding…we aren’t really sure but, we are sure that this introspectively sophisticated version of “Away in a Manger” by the amazingly talented pianist, John Beasley will do the job.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

By now we think you get the idea

Click here to find more eclectic holiday cues including:

  • Retro Christmas Music
  • Hip Hop Christmas Music
  • Electro Christmas Music
  • Rock Christmas Music
  • Ambient Christmas Music

Or you might still want the traditional stuff, of which we have plenty.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Production Music Friends With Benefits

Production Music FriendIn a world where producers and filmmakers are often forced to skirt on their music choices (“There’s no budget, my nephew Skyler can make us some tracks in Garage Band”) it might seem unlikely that one could actually obtain high quality underscore without going deep into the pocket.  Let’s face it, there are few attributes that can improve the overall production value like great music, but the notion, for instance, of a deeply orchestrated and thoughtfully composed soundtrack seems out of reach.

There can be some clever ways around this if you understand how to access and select the right music at the right price, so in the spirit of enlightened self-interest, we’ll show you how. As owners of a production music library, one thing that consistently amazes us is how often we will receive richly orchestrated material that embodies many years of training and true flair for composition; really spectacular stuff that runs the gamut from Hollywood to Downton Abbey.  We have hundreds of such tracks intelligently organized and waiting for clever filmmakers to have their way with them.

And here’s the extra benefit: Because we are such nice, liberal-minded owners who keep our greed to an absolute minimum, (and who genuinely DESPISE crappy production music), we allow you, the independent or documentary filmmaker, to access our COMMERCIAL LEVEL 2 pricing. Simply put, a genuinely spectacular bit of Orchestral (or any other genre you want) Underscore is available for immediate download for twenty bucks a track, cleared, done, finito, over. If you need a whole bunch of music or are working on multiple projects, you can get our COMMERCIAL LEVEL 2 BLANKET; that, for 750 dollars, allows you to download unlimited amounts of music for one year. Think about this: you can try out THOUSANDS (well, that may be excessive, but you COULD) of tracks in your work and get exactly the feel you like without trying to communicate to your long suffering editor in terms that would make Kafka shudder: “It needs to be like lighter, with a heavy electro acoustic ambient tone and with, I don’t know, some bass or strings, Maybe a flute” (No, really-we hear this kind of stuff on a daily basis).

The Organic Music Library is certainly not the only production music site that offers spectacular music at a reasonable rate, but we like to think of ourselves as one of the Premiere connection points between amazing composers and filmmakers. Think of us as your friend.

Yes, that kind of friend.

Browse our Music

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

6 Great ways to Search for Production Music

Finding that perfect cue for your video footage can be tricky and tiresome. There are too many choices out there, and if you use a crowd-sourced library, you will have to sift through thousands of amateurish returns before locating a track to suit your needs.  The Organic Music Library makes your production music searching effortless and fun. In conjunction with offering only premium quality cues, we give you six entirely different ways to search & access our music. Try these different methods, all of which are explained in the above video, and find out which one best suits you!

OML Search Methods:
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Finding High Quality Production Music Quickly

Visit the Organic Music Library


Let’s face it – Finding quality stock music licensing that you really like can be a nightmare. Why? Because most production music libraries “crowdsource” their music, in bulk. Any amateur  with a synthesizer can upload their “creations” for you to muddle through. Now, multiply that by thousands and you could spend hours sifting through generic clips looking for quality music that you actually want to use.

The  Organic music library does not Crowdsource our production music, Our writers have won over 60 MAJOR industry awards including Emmys, Grammys & Clios. You will find ONLY Real music by real musicians here, thoroughly curated and intuitively organized for quick and effective searching. Take a quick tour through our library and you’ll hear what we mean.

After you find exactly what you wanted, you’ll download it and begin using it within minutes because our licensing is super simple.  Join Organic Music Library now and get better production music, faster, and cheaper.

More Reasons to get your Stock Music from the Organic Music Library

  • We’re A World Class Production Music Resource with a mom and pop attitude.
  • We know what you (and your suits) need and we give it to you.
  • All of our production music music is pre-cleared and ready to use.
  • Pricing is fantastic, and we offer super discounts to various types of users; you’ll be pleasantly surprised. (BTW-we have a nearly 100% renewal rate with existing clientele-so we’re doing something right!)
  • So if you want to impress your boss by churning out quality sounding work and saving him a buck, you’re at the right place.
  • We offer the highest quality downloadable stock music for the lowest price period. And, if you use a lot of music, We have AMAZING blanket license deals that can lower your cost per cue to ridiculously low levels.
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Film Music: What if Nino Rota had Fruity Loops?

Today we are celebrating the Birthday of composer Nino Rota. He is most famous for his astonishing film score music,  a list of credits that includes Zeffirelli’s Romeo and Juliette, almost every film that Fellini directed, and oh yeah …. Coppola’s “The Godfather(s).”  His style has been influential to so many of today’s film music composers; Danny Elfman may be the first to come to mind.

As we saw his name appear on our “Famous Birthdays” list (yes..we are the type of geeks who follow famous Birthday lists) with his birth year listed as 1911, we began to wonder what would have been different if  he had been born in, say, 1991; a time in which Nino would have had access to things like Fruity Loops and Garage Band as tools for his expression of genius. Speaking of Nino, would his name have been Nins or Kyle or something derived from an order of Primates? Would he have been bitchin’ on a skateboard half pipe? And, would he have used stock, looped material to create his film music?

We wondered further:

Would he have created the Godfather theme starting with Apple’s “Exotic Beat 03”  stacked underneath “80’s Dance Bass Synth 02” with “Middle Eastern Oud 01” on top, dropping in alternating occurrences of “Latin Lounge Piano” and “Modern Rock Guitar?” Would he have shared it with his iTunes library and uploaded it to his favorite “Crowd Sourced” production music libraries that accept any and all submissions no matter the source? Would the scene of Sonny kicking the living s*&t out of Carlo, his schevey  brother-in-law been underscored with Italian Mandolin 04?

We think not.

Since we are TV and film composers ourselves who, more importantly, have the privilege of representing the music of some of the world’s most talented writers, we are aware of the fact that even though these shortcuts are available,  our gang, as it were, chooses not to overindulge in this sonic vice.

Music by numbers is like Elvis on Black Velvet: good for a tawdry laugh, bad for your creative endeavors.

Filmmakers, TV editors, and creative directors who take pride in their footage should be on the lookout for these atrocities. Picture the following (all too familiar) scenario:

You are in a rush to find a production music cue to fill in the last 30 seconds of a particularly nauseating fast food chain expose while your intern has his finger on the upload button waiting to launch a file to meet your client’s deadline. You, harried and haggard from lack of sleep and too many Carmel Lattes stumble upon one of the afore-mentioned crowd-sourced libraries. You enter search term “Food-Poisoning”, this produces 2,456 results. You grab the third one, “Klezmer Gangsta” since you have no time left.

And this, my friends, is how such music can seep into, and despoil your stellar productions.

This is why libraries like the Organic Music Library are the best option for content creators who truly value the tremendous impact music has on their footage: We, and others like us, are CURATED sources of production music. We’ve spent years cultivating our catalogue; there is no filler, no junk.  Our boutique, “Non-Walmart” approach provides you, the user, manageable search returns of  consistently higher quality music. Trust us, you don’t need 4,652 results when entering “ROCK” or “AGGRESSIVE” or some other utterly subjective nomenclature like “EDGY” (what is that anyway-these relative terms are time wasters for people searching out tracks-we don’t employ them) when you’re under the production gun.

And you most certainly don’t need a track generated by Nin’s experiment in combining “Lounge Vibes 11” with his mom’s Oxycontin.

Since we are celebrating the birthday of one of the finest film composers of all time, we would like to know your favorite composers/scores. Tell us in the comments below.

Amarcord Nino Rota, and long live real music by real composers!

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

It Takes Three to Tango: Filmmakers, Composers, & Music Libraries

Tango Production MusicGather round all ye who make, or would make films and listen to a little story from our checkered past.

Once upon a time there was a major Hollywood Film starring major Hollywood dudes; one of  which who may or may not have been Tim Robbins. This movie had a wonderful composer attached to the project who did a basically superb job of scoring 95% of the flick. There were, however, a couple of humps the said composer was not quite getting over: to whit the need for an Argentinean Tango. Yikes! What to do? What to do?

The answer of course lay in reaching out to a Production Music Library; in particular one of which yours truly happened to be part owner. The library had the flexibility to deliver the perfect track without stepping on the composer’s toes, keeping the filmmakers and producers very happy. So this tale very naturally leads us here at the Organic Music Library to ask filmmakers of all types to consider that it’s a rare occurrence indeed when your composer can truly be effective with ALL the music needs a film may have.

Let’s take the case of our friend Skyler; the Electro Whiz with really cool hair and an attitude that gives him Lower East Side club cred. This guy produces sonic tapestries that create the whole “INDY moodiness modern youthful cinema I am destined to win awards and eventually sleep with Kristen Bell” thing. But when it’s time for the brief interlude scene in the overpriced restaurant and one needs some mellow solo piano or perhaps a string quartet, Skyler’s filter sweeps and synth drones aren’t going to cut it. So instead of wrestling with nature (Or Skyler for that matter, let’s give him a Red Bull and potato chip break) reach  out to a High End Production Music Library like us and your film will be the better for it.

The Organic Music Library represents the work of over 200 fascinating composers. People with real composing skill and superb production chops. When you avail yourself of a talent pool like this, you swim happily. Pricing and licensing are fantastic and we go out of our way to support Independent Film.

Stop by and let’s see if we can get involved in a Three Way.

Visit The Organic Music Library: Quirky & Fun, but deadly serious about great production music.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

But I Want My Production Music For Free!

Feel free to read the title of this blog in a whining voice. Go ahead…“I Want my Production Music Free!”

Yes, of course you do, and we want world peace, complimentary dentistry and that Cable TV thing your cousin Vinnie gave you that lets you illegally watch the MILF channel all day. If we could squeeze Dr. Whitetooth and his Nitrous Oxide through the DSL lines we’d probably demand he be free too. Free Music. What a concept. Let us ask you: In general, do you think a true professional gives away their product or service (that may have taken them years and years to develop-maybe you’ve heard about that 10,000 hour thing?) for no compensation? Focus on that word “PROFESSIONAL”; it means something when it comes to production music.

An unfortunate side-effect of unfettered free access to the web (we support this in case you’re wondering) is the“License Free” music site that allows anybody with Garage Band or worse yet, a PC based app, to get off of their skateboards and create some concoction of loops to upload and giveaway. Fair enough, market economics and all that, but don’t get caught for one second thinking that this audio pollution is “Professional”; there’s a reason it’s free.  When you are offered something for free on the web, yes…even a free Yahoo search, the provider is getting something in return: At best you are being slammed with ads and windows that open up and talk to you. We really hate windows that talk to you; especially if they include a picture of that woman with the headphone thing on. But the really scary part of the trade is your information. The way most free sites make their money (“But they said it was free!”) is by providing your information to others. Some may be harmless spammers, but who knows where all that goes? You may even find yourself a Russian wife that thinks you’re hot, a very good deal on Viagra to keep up with her, and 70 million dollars in bank drafts that need to go into your account immediately if you download enough free stuff.

Reputable Libraries like The Organic Music Library offer production music at price points that are extremely affordable & fair for broadcast professionals. We even feature a Micro License for 5 bucks, (FIVE BUCKS!) for non-profit YouTube Auteurs. Our music is created by some of the best PROFESSIONAL composers available, (Multiple Emmy Winners & Grammy Nominees!), curated and organized through our extremely discerning filtering system. Which means… you don’t have to listen to fifty tracks by the production team of Skyler, Tyler, & Cody and their mom’s boyfriend’s PC rig before you find the perfect underscore for that footage of your fat uncle slipping down the patio steps on a BBQ’ed chicken breast.

And best of all…it’s LEGAL, LICENSED and cleared for usage; YouTube etc. won’t hassle you when you use production music legitimately.

Keeping it real, (we’re big fans of this whole particle physics thing) we wouldn’t be having this conversation if music wasn’t one of the few commodities that can be easily stolen from the internet.

Think about the implications the next time you look for “free music” – you really can’t afford it.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment